Conclusions

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We draw two conclusions from the data examined in these pages:
  • Accurate observations, both remotely sensed observations and in situ observations, are essential if water problems are to be understood and dealt with. The dryness of the Middle East is part of a global pattern of climate. Only by observing and understanding the global climate can problems associated with the local climate be wisely approached.

  • In regions which have climates similar to those of the Middle East, the answer since Roman times to water shortages has been water projects. The Romans built aqueducts throughout the dry parts of their empire. Today, California is extensively supplied with water from distant sources. Water projects are common in the Middle East also. The Asswan High Dam on the Nile in Egypt, the Israeli National Water Carrier, and the Ataturk Dam on the Euphrates River in Turkey are but a few examples. What these Web pages make clear to us, at least, is that the climate of the Middle East is unrelentingly dry. Only extraordinary cooperative efforts to increase water supply and decrease water demand will be able to cope with the rapidly increasing population of the region. We hope that the long history of conflict in the area can be overcome to achieve a stable water supply. And we will even go as far as stating that the sharing of data and ideas might be a key step toward this much needed cooperation.

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